Single Thistle Kilt Pin Pewter

$31.45

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

  • Antiqued pewter kilt pin in the shape of a thistle with large glass stone at the top.
  • Approx 83mm high x 48mm wide
  • Available in amethyst, emerald and sapphire

 

 

The thistle has been a symbol of Scotland for over 500 years. It’s first recognisable use was on silver coins in 1470 during the reign of James III and it was incorporated into the Royal Arms of Scotland in the early 16th Century.

Historical fact and legend surrounds the origination of the thistle as a symbol of Scotland. For more than 600 years most of Scotland formed part of the kingdom of Norway. By the 13th Century their interest had waned only to be re-ignited following efforts by King Alexander III to buy back the Western Isles and Kintyre which were still Norwegian occupied in 1263.

King Haaken IV assembled an army to re-establish control but it was forced by bad weather to land at Largs. Ordered to remove their footwear so as not to alert a group of sleeping Scots warriors, one stepped on a thistle, cried out sufficiently for the Scots to waken. A battle promptly ensued and the Norwegians were defeated.

In gratitude the plant became known as the Guardian Thistle. In 1540 King James V formed the Order of the Thistle, the highest honour in Scotland. Their medal contains the inscription “nemo me impune lacessit”, which means “ no-one harms me without punishment “.

The Luckenbooth brooch was originally given to a woman as a sign of betrothal. If she gave birth to a child, she would pin the brooch on to the shawl of her first born, to protect it from evil. The Mary brooch, is so called as it is reputed that Mary Queen of Scots wore one of these brooches, which has two hearts joined together.

 

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Add to wishlist Expected release date is Aug 24th 2018

Description

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

  • Antiqued pewter kilt pin in the shape of a thistle with large glass stone at the top.
  • Approx 83mm high x 48mm wide
  • Available in amethyst, emerald and sapphire

 

 

The thistle has been a symbol of Scotland for over 500 years. It’s first recognisable use was on silver coins in 1470 during the reign of James III and it was incorporated into the Royal Arms of Scotland in the early 16th Century.

Historical fact and legend surrounds the origination of the thistle as a symbol of Scotland. For more than 600 years most of Scotland formed part of the kingdom of Norway. By the 13th Century their interest had waned only to be re-ignited following efforts by King Alexander III to buy back the Western Isles and Kintyre which were still Norwegian occupied in 1263.

King Haaken IV assembled an army to re-establish control but it was forced by bad weather to land at Largs. Ordered to remove their footwear so as not to alert a group of sleeping Scots warriors, one stepped on a thistle, cried out sufficiently for the Scots to waken. A battle promptly ensued and the Norwegians were defeated.

In gratitude the plant became known as the Guardian Thistle. In 1540 King James V formed the Order of the Thistle, the highest honour in Scotland. Their medal contains the inscription “nemo me impune lacessit”, which means “ no-one harms me without punishment “.

The Luckenbooth brooch was originally given to a woman as a sign of betrothal. If she gave birth to a child, she would pin the brooch on to the shawl of her first born, to protect it from evil. The Mary brooch, is so called as it is reputed that Mary Queen of Scots wore one of these brooches, which has two hearts joined together.

 

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Additional info

SKU: MKP111S
Warranty: LIFETIME GUARANTEE As with all Miracle Jewellery products, this item comes with a lifetime guarantee. If there is a fault in the workmanship, we will repair or replace it free of charge. Simple.